No Worries Curries Blog: Street Food

Capital of a Nation & of Culinary Delights - Delhicious Delhi

By Conchita de Souza

Capital of a Nation & of Culinary Delights - Delhicious Delhi
I spent close to two years living in a large suburb called Noida - just on the outskirts of Delhi. Many a weekend was spent taking the over-populated, but very clean and well-connected metro into town and exploring all corners of Delhi. Much like any large city, each quarter had something different to offer; from high end shopping in the white colonial buildings of Connaught Place (CP, as it is is affectionately abbreviated) to exploring historical sites like an ancient step-well situated just ten minutes from the city centre. 

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Indian Festivals: Navratri or Durga Puja

By Conchita de Souza

Indian Festivals: Navratri or Durga Puja
Navratri in Sanskrit, means ‘nine nights’ (‘nava’ is ‘nine’ and ‘ratri’ is ‘nights’) and the festival goes exactly for that duration. It is dedicated to the Goddess Durga (also known as Maa Durga)and the nine avatars (forms) which she manifests herself. Each night celebrates one of her forms. During this time, devotees come together to fast, worship and celebrate the different forms of the devi (female god) and her victory over the demon Mahishasur.

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Bombay, Meri Jaan - Reflections From The City of Dreams

By Conchita de Souza

Bombay, Meri Jaan - Reflections From The City of Dreams
There’s something about the city of Mumbai that makes it a magical megapolis in which the lives of its twenty-million something inhabitants takes place. It is a city of extreme contrasts; from the glitz and glamour of the film industry that is Bollywood to the grime, dust and stark poverty of its largest slum - Dharavi.  When you walk through the streets of Mumbai, all of your senses are overwhelmed in each moment captured by your eyes.

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The Heat of Hyderabadi Cuisine in the Cool of the Indian Monsoon

By Claudette D'Cruz

The Heat of Hyderabadi Cuisine in the Cool of the Indian Monsoon

I must say that when it comes to the hot summer days in Sydney (which seem quite distant right now as we are smack bang in the middle of autumn), I welcome nothing more than the stormy evenings that follow which settle the dust and temper the heat’s rage.  Whilst Australian summers can be hot, it really is nothing compared to summers in most parts of India which involve three months of unceasing, unforgiving and relenting 40+ degree heat. The night brings enough relief for our burnt souls to slumber before we wake the next day to face summer’s wrath.  Until one has lived through an entire Indian summer, one really cannot appreciate the relief that the monsoon rains bring.  The weather becomes pleasant, albeit a tad humid; the landscape becomes green and lush (which unfortunately the mosquitoes seem to enjoy and hence begin their season of breeding); and most importantly, the appetite increases sevenfold as the tastebuds start to crave.  They crave anything remotely hot, spicy, crispy and creamy (sometimes all at once) after being subdued by the summer’s stifling heat and being released from the want of all things icy, liquid and juicy.


It was during this climate that I explored the famous cuisines of Hyderabad; with the skies grey, low and impregnated by the drops of monsoon rains, now in its second month of falling on to parched earth.  Hyderabad is the capital city of Telangana, a state which was recently formed in 2014.  Before that, Hyderabad had long been under the rule of the Nizams - the Monarchs who were once a part of the Mughal Empire, but declared themselves independent after the Empire collapsed in 1724. The Nizams ruled over Hyderabad until it was annexed during an Indian military operation post Indian independence in 1948.  When you travel throughout the city, there are remnants of this rule in the ancient landmarks as well as in the customs, cultures and feel of this bustling city.


One weekend I wandered through the old city of Hyderabad which sports the iconic landmark which has become synonymous with Hyderabad - Charminar.  It was not my first visit to this beautiful place, but I had still gone with my camera in hand, ready to capture the culinary delights as much as the magnificent architecture.  I visited a famous restaurant called Shahran, just outside one of the four gateways leading to Charminar. It is known for its delicious and crispy samosas and also its beef kebab served with peanut chutney and hot, oily, and soft parathas (click here for our simple stuffed paratha recipe).  I could not go past ordering a pink falooda, a popular drink made from rosewater, milk and vermicelli.  Not too far from Shahran is the famous Nimrah Bakery, which always has a crowd of people inside and outside the joint. Nimrah Bakery has a very simple menu of chai, various biscuits and puffs - it is basically a tea spot.  I squeezed myself into a booth joining a family of four messily slurping their tea and munching on their biscuits.  I ordered Suleimani chai (strong black tea) and Osmani biscuits - yet another (edible) symbol of Hyderabad.  These biscuits are buttery and subtly sweet at first bite but once they leave your tongue they part with mild salty taste - similar to that of a cracker.  They go darn well with chai and are a popular take-back gift for most visitors to Hyderabad.  I’ll unashamedly admit that I returned to Nimrah Bakery the following week for the same Osmani biscuits this time accompanied with a sweeter and milky Irani Chai.  It was divine, as expected.

Charminar literally means 'four minarets' and is surrounded by amazing food spots offering a variety of Hyderabadi specialities.


Hyderabad is also famous for its biryani - a festive dish made from a spicy, flavoursome and thick gravy containing meat (popular choices are mutton and chicken) which is absorbed by fragrant and colourful basmati rice.  Paradise Restaurant is said to serve some of the  best biryani dishes in Hyderabad and it is so famous that there are road signs directing people towards it (which I dutifully followed to reach the said destination)!  This time round, I went to Paradise for their range of delectable kebabs (mutton shami and garlic chicken) which are always served with green chutney, lemon wedges and raw onions just because life is a lot tastier with all these three ingredients.


You might be wondering when this ode to Hyderabadi cuisine will draw to an end, and I would like to politely inform you that it shall, soon, but not without mention of one last iconic dish, Dosa.  Dosa is a staple in south India and is differently prepared and consumed throughout the south (we have an instant dosa version that you can try out without the fuss right here). In Hyderabad, I was introduced to the ‘butter cheese dosa’ by a local friend.  It kind of tastes like a thinner, crispier and spicier version of pizza.  When I first watched the street vendor make the dosa right in front of me, I was alarmed by the copious amounts of ghee, butter and cheese he so liberally lashed out. As soon as I took my first bite, the alarm melted away at the same rate as the cheese in my dosa did (it was fast, very fast). I must warn you that this butter cheese dosa is deceptively heavy and might result in the unfortunate skipping of your next meal.  But seeing as I was still in Hyderabad and had much more to do (read - eat), I wasn’t too concerned by just how satiated I was and wobbled along before the rains reached their point of wrath.


If you have fallen in love with Hyderabad’s rich cuisine but can’t just as yet afford the air ticket to get there, we’ve got you covered.  You can bring the flavours of Hyderabad to your kitchen with a little help from our naturally-blended and authentic spices.  Try making our baked Hyderabadi Koftas (Baked Meatballs) or if you are feeling like a feast - our rich Biryani, all from the comfort of your kitchen.



By Conchita A. de Souza

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Hitting The Streets with India's Vast Array of Street Food

By Claudette D'Cruz

Hitting The Streets with India's Vast Array of Street Food

When you are roaming the streets of India’s cities and suburbs, you will find one common factor that unites them all.  No, it is not the excessive honking of vehicles overcrowding the roads. Neither is it the numerous potholes, uneven pavements and surprise ditches that one encounters whilst trying to walk down the streets.  It is in fact, the endless street stalls and stands that offer quick, tasty and creative snacks to satisfy your hunger.  The best thing about street food in India, is that your impatient hunger need not wait very long to be satiated by the textures, flavours, temperatures and colours offered by these hard-working street vendors.

 

Here are some of my favourite street items that I indulge in to satisfy my notorious state of hangry.

 

  1. Pani Puri/Golgappas - Pani puri, or Gol Gappas (as it is known in the north) are a must-taste street food and treasured by all Indians (not even generalising here). The complexity involved in this dish lies in the textures and layers added. The ‘puri’ is a deep fried bread, which puffs once dunked in hot oil and hardens when removed from it. ‘Pani’ means water in Hindi, and in this dish, it is flavoured with an array of spices including cumin powder, chaat masala, fresh mint and coriander, giving it a green appearance. A hole is made in the puri by pressing the thumb against it until the surface cracks.  Either boiled mashed potatoes or chickpeas are added into the puri, followed by finely cut purple onions and then the tangy Pani.  The trick is to eat the puri as a whole without making a mess of yourself (yet to master this).  What amazes me the most about pani puri is not the dish itself, but how it is dished out, making it the ultimate act of multitasking.  Each plate contains 5 puris, served one at a time because as soon as you add the water, the puri has to be consumed else it will not hold.  The vendor can be serving up to 5 to 7 people at a time, customising each puri (bhayaa - pyaaz nahin chahiye, bhayaa mujhe extra aloo chahiye, brother - no onions, brother I want extra potato) as it is gulped down.  As he serves the customised puris to the different customers, he is also keeping count of how many they consume all at once.  Sometimes I go to the pani puri stand to merely admire how these vendors have mastered multi-tasking, and that too, in the dust and heat whilst their hungry customers await their fulfillment.

  2. Aloo Tikki Chaat - Let’s admit that the humble potato is no doubt the greatest vegetable of all time because it can be prepared in literally a thousand ways.  On the streets in India, a popular preparation of potato is known as Aloo Tikki Chaat - a spicy potato patty/cake served with tangy chutneys.  I remember the first time that I tasted this street food - I wanted something simple and I saw the perfectly shaped patties sitting on the edge of the large tava (a flat, handle-less pan usually made of cast iron).  I hungrily asked the vendor for just one patty which he warmed on the tava and put onto a plate.  I reached my hand out to take it from him when to my alarm, he mashed the tikki with his bare hands, sprinkled raw onions and scoops of coriander and tamarind chutney on top. He added sev (deep-fried potato noodles), chaat masala and then lemon juice. All the while my hand remained in an outstretched position wanting the simple aloo tikki patty.  What I got instead was a sour-sweet-spicy-tangy-hot-cold-crunchy-soft mish mash of deliciousness.  The lesson I learnt: In India, you never quite get what you expect, but what you do get will never disappoint you!

  3. Chai - Did you really think we could have a post on street food in India without giving mention to chai? Chai vendors are brilliant at business and have the knack of setting up their stalls in places where your cravings for chai just happen to materialise - which is basically anywhere and everywhere.  Coming out of the temple?  Have some chai to go with the prasad (a devotional offering made to God and usually sweet).  Leaving college?  A chai-stall has been set up in the car park so you can re-energise before the ride home.  Climbing the Himalayas?  Of course you will need to stop for a chai break to warm your cold soul!  Depending on the region you are in, your chai can have spices (cinnamon and cardamom), be made with malai (cream), or have extra chinni (sugar).  These are just a few of the variations you may encounter as your drink away through cups and cups of this glorious drink.  Have a read of our post dedicated to the beverage which is India’s lifeblood here. Better yet, impress your family and friends by becoming a chai-wallah or chai walli (tea-maker) with our Chai Latte spice blend.

  4. Andha Paratha - This might seem like a pretty standard breakfast you could whip up at home but hold up, it is the amount of oil and the concoction of spicy sauces which make this street food best consumed a little less often than the daily breakfast.  Put simply, this is an egg wrap - a fried egg cooked inside a flatbread called paratha. However, on the street, the egg is sometimes fried with onions and almost always mixed with sweet and spicy chutneys and sauces (I was too afraid to ask what was inside them).  It is enjoyed hot on the spot and after eating it, I guarantee you will feel that warm and fuzzy feeling in your belly.

  5. Kulfi - After all that spicy and hot street food, you will definitely need something to cool down your tongue and sweeten your tastebuds.  Street kulfi is the perfect treat for that.  Kulfi is Indian ice cream and is made by simmering full-cream milk until it starts to get slightly nutty and thick.  The kulfi vendors have these wheely top load fridges, which they open to reveal metal holes the size of a 50 cent coin filled with the kulfi which they pull out and serve to you. There are different varieties of kulfi, and my favourite is the original milky one. You can enjoy flavours like badam (almond), kesar (saffron), malai (cream) and pista (pistachio),   We’ve got our own easy recipe you can try here and it involves ingredients you will easily find at your local grocery store.  Kulfi, when made well, is the perfect balance between the textures ‘icy’ and ‘creamy’ and is a front-runner when it comes to the world’s best ice creams (bring on the Italians and their gelatos!).

I could probably write a book on the numerous street foods available across India, but that would be another task in itself. My advice to you is to come over and experience the variety, wonder and delight that the street food will offer your tastebuds. For those of you who have tasted Indian Street Food, I would love to hear what you rate as your favourite.  Comment below and let us know!

 

By Conchita A. de Souza

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